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Paying for residential and nursing care


What happens to my property?

When completing the financial assessment we include any property or land that you solely or jointly own. This includes the home where you live and any other property or land, such as a holiday home. We treat these differently based on the charging regulations and whether you are moving into a care home on a permanent, temporary or respite basis.

When moving into permanent residential or nursing care

In the first 12 weeks of your permanent stay, the value of the home where you live will not be taken into account, unless you sell the property before the end of this 12 week period. After this period the value of your home will not be included if it will still be occupied by:

  • your spouse or partner
  • a relative aged 60 or over
  • a relative aged under 60 who receives disability-related benefits such as Personal Independence Payment (PIP) or Disability Living Allowance (DLA).

If none of these apply the value of your home is likely to be included.

If you own property or land other than where you live, such as a holiday home, the value will be included in your financial assessment from the start.

When you move into permanent residential or nursing care, it is your duty to tell the Department of Work and Pensions (DWP) and disability benefits offices that your circumstances have changed.

If you have a spouse or partner their entitlement to benefits may be affected by your move into permanent residential or nursing care. We recommend that they seek advice from their local Citizens Advice Bureau (CAB) or the DWP, and contact their district council for Council Tax and Housing Benefit advice.

Temporary or respite stays in residential or nursing care

We don’t include the value of the property where you live. If you own property or land other than where you live, such as a holiday home, the value will be included in your financial assessment from the start.


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