Highways signs and injuries

I wish to make a request under the freedom of information act for information that relates to the highways inspection reports and procedures for maintenance workers and anything that relates to the fixing of signs including the correct height that you advise your staff and the legislation that maintenance engineers need to adhere to.

The Devon County Council Highway Safety Manual, which sets all procedures for the inspections of highways, also details heights for inspections. This can be viewed online at:

https://new.devon.gov.uk/roadsandtransport/maintaining-roads/highways-safety-inspections/

There is no formal policy in the Traffic Management Team as mounting heights for signs is covered within the Traffic Signs Manuals, which provides appropriate advice based on different circumstances. These documents are issued by the Department for Transport and copies are attached via the link below:

https://devoncc.sharepoint.com/:b:/s/PublicDocs/InfoMgt/EcKbhdrNCDlMof66PmxwchUBQReVjHF9yJwYgIArc4u3ng?e=1Bfnos

What are the procedures should there be a report of a water leak which causes the sign to sink and what procedures are in place to inform the necessary water authority of such a leak?
If there is nothing that is written anywhere please could you kindly confirm that there is nothing in writing that relates to safety checking height wise of the signs on posts particularly of those mounted on the pavements when carrying out an inspection.

Section 81 of New Roads and Street Works Act 1991 sets out the duty of a utility company to maintain their apparatus. This includes the notification which can be given to a utility company if “emergency works” are required.

This can be viewed online at:

http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1991/22/section/81

I would also like to know how many personal injury reports you have had in the last 10 years where people have been injured as a result of dangerous, low and hazardous road signs on pavements in your area.

There have been 9 reports in the last 10 years.